Construction Defects Are Serious Concerns in the Pacific Northwest

After a ten year run, the 25-story McGuire apartment complex located in Seattle's Belltown neighborhood is scheduled for demolition thanks to construction defects that would cost more to fix than the building is worth. Rusting cables with ends that were never coated with anti-corrosion agents vein the tower's concrete slabs and pockets in the building's concrete foundation were never properly sealed, leading to the tower's demise. The McGuire tower has been vacant for some time, and within 12 to 16 months, it will be gone for good.

Residential, Commercial Buildings at Risk

The McGuire tower is a prime example of how the effects of shoddy construction are exacerbated by Pacific Northwest's wet climate. Mold, corrosion, and severe leaks all can be caused by improper sealing and waterproofing in any kind of building in Washington or Oregon.

Of course, water intrusion is not the only construction concern for new home or business owners. Faulty windows, foundational settling, building code violations, and defective building materials are all commonly observed problems in recently-constructed buildings.

Not only can these defects be expensive to fix, but they also can expose you and your family to danger. Exposure to mold can be a health risk, and corroding or crumbling structures are dangerous to your family and visitors.

Construction defects also can result in legal liability for a home or business owner. Uneven or poorly-designed walking surfaces may cause falls, for example, and you are legally obligated to provide a safe environment for guests in your home or business.

Protecting Yourself

If there is a construction defect in your home, fixing it promptly yet correctly is essential. Seek expert opinions on your fixes, and schedule regular inspections with independent consultants.

Once you have noticed a construction problem with your home or other building you own, it is also important to contact a real estate attorney with experience in construction-defect cases as soon as possible.

A statute of limitations is a law that limits the amount of time someone has to file a lawsuit after a legal issue is discovered. The exact time frame available to file a construction-defect lawsuit varies depending on the unique circumstances of each case.

In general, construction firms are responsible for paying the repair costs of problems caused by their substandard work. But, if you let too much time pass, you will not be allowed to file a lawsuit and may be denied recovery of any potential monetary damages from your builder.

If you have found a construction defect in your home, business or any other building, contact an experienced real estate attorney as soon as possible to ensure that any right you have to compensation does not expire.