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Business formation for companies that will sell food

For an Oregon entrepreneur who has dreamed of opening his or her own restaurant or food business, it can be exciting to watch that dream finally take shape. During the business formation stage, it is easy to see how excitement can cause a person to rush ahead with certain things, but there are many important things for a business owner to take into consideration. This is especially true for a food service business or company that will make or sell food products.

There are specific laws in place that dictate how business can sell prepared food. Oregon laws mandate how companies that want to make and sell food do certain things, like handling prepared food, storing food products and more. The state will also do inspections before a business can open, and the company will be subject to other evaluations on occasion.

It is also possible that state laws can determine where a company prepares food. There are likely limits to how a home-based food business can make food at home and sell it to customers. At some point, it may be necessary for a company to rent space from which to operate. There are various legal issues to consider for every type of food business, from small companies run out of a family kitchen to bigger businesses that need commercial space.

Business formation can be a complicated process. There are many things for an Oregon owner to consider as he or she moves forward. Due to the complex laws and regulations that may impact food-related businesses, there is significant benefit in working with an attorney who knows the law and can help an entrepreneur avoid future complications. 

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